Furniture and Interiors at Osterley Park

Furniture and Interiors at Osterley Park

December 21, 2018

Osterley Park remains one of our favourite country houses in England. We have visited it a few times by now and each time there is something new to explore or see from a different angle (often, quite literally).

We never get bored of this extraordinary salon seat furniture suite by John Linnell: one could admire the exquisite carving and the untouched surface on the mahogany for hours... 

The Grand Staircase is an utter delight, from its sublime colour scheme to the crisp plasterwork.

We must admit, we have a thing for fluted decoration on furniture. In this case, finely carved and highlighted in colour, it looks particularly elegant. How can one not love these wonderful chairs by John Linnell? You rarely see such a well-balanced design, with such a complex shape and delightful detail throughout. Note the legs (even the back ones) decorated all around.

Uber-elegant cantilever stairs with Robert Adam's signature cast iron railings. Note the subtle presence of Vitruvian scroll on the handrail.

Wonderfully flowing design throughout the house creates the sense of movement and interconnection of decorative elements in different parts of the house.

 This lantern (one of three in the Grand Staircase) is a work of art.

All carved decorations in the house possess a pleasing crispness 

How can one not love these wonderful chairs by John Linnell? You rarely see such a well-balanced design, with such a complex shape and delightful detail throughout. Note the legs (even the back ones) decorated all around. The gentle curve to back legs is unusual combined with fluted decoration, but it elevates the design to a whole new level of elegance.

One of a superb set of hall furniture, which was, by repute, sent to China for lacquer decoration.

Generous proportions and subtlety of decor. 

Love the bold colour! 

In fact, bold colours help to complement the strong architectural features of a room.

 Absolutely love this neoclassical chest of drawers, most likely bu Linnell. Its unusually tall for a drawer piece feet make it visually lightweight and resembling the grand commodes, which normally had the drawers concealed behind the ornate doors.

It is fascinating how English Rococo does not at all look out of place combined with neoclassicism. 

Despite that the silk used for the wall-covering and upholstery does not much contrast with the gilding, the overall effect of this room is quite pleasing. It is grand, but - subtle. In a way.

 The correct profiles of 1760's upholstery.

 A delightful penwork-decorated table by Henry Clay, circa 1780.

 Sublime neoclassical plasterwork of the portico ceiling.

Sublime neoclassical plasterwork of the portico ceiling.

Thanks for your interest, we hope that you have enjoyed! To stay inspired, check out our other blog posts and browse our collection of furniture and decorative arts from the 18th and 19th centuries.